SAVE THE DATE!

cat party

Happy Birthday TFAL! We made it to one year! Join us & help us celebrate a year of air horns, half baked ideas, and stories that have made us and you giggle.

There will be bbq.
There will be beers.
There will be (possibly) karaoke.

Saturday, May 13th
8pm-Midnight

Many thanks to the homies at The Park’s Finest for hosting our one year shindig!

RSVP HERE: Happy Birthday TFAL

See you there,
TFAL mastermind Joe,
Food Appreciator Ryan
Oblivious Nerd Girl Elaine
Producer Mike

FilAm Creations

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FilAm Creative, a Filipino American network of artists in Film and TV, highlight storytelling by Filipino Americans at Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival this year. This program features two short films with a TFAL connection! Producer Mike grew up with filmmaker Rommel Andaya. Rommel has two films featured in the FilAm Creations program “What You Don’t Say” and “Uncle Eddy.”

I have always been drawn to film competitions because it challenges me as a filmmaker and gets everybody together to make a film.

–Rommel Andaya

Check out what FilAm Creative has curated on Wednesday, May 3rd! Get your tickets today!

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Remember you can always purchase a Ticket Package! Festival Ticket 10-Pack ($120 Member/$135 General) Buy 10 tickets at a discounted price! Festival Pass ($300 Member/$330 General) Get priority seating and entry to the majority of Festival events!

Bronzeville Little Tokyo

 

Form follows Function continues it’s collaboration with Visual Communications with Bronzeville Little Tokyo. This project highlights history that has been overlooked; the time Japanese and Japanese Americans were put in internment camps and African Americans moved into Little Tokyo. This program consists of projection mapping, a new animated VR piece, and live music. Events are FREE to the public!

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Producer Mike checks out a copy of the Bronzeville News, a newspaper themed flyer that explains Bronzeville Little Tokyo. Pick up on during LAAPFF!

Bronzeville, Little Tokyo

Historic Nishi Building
April 29, 2017 3:00 pm 

Historic Nishi Building
April 30, 2017 3:00 pm 

Union Center for the Arts Courtyard
April 30, 2017 6:00 pm 

laapff 2017

Remember you can always purchase a Ticket Package! Festival Ticket 10-Pack ($120 Member/$135 General) Buy 10 tickets at a discounted price! Festival Pass ($300 Member/$330 General) Get priority seating and entry to the majority of Festival events!

Episode 11: Undocumented Filipinos

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As Filipino Americans, we all know or know of someone in our lives who is undocumented.  That one uncle who left his family in the Philippines.  That one auntie who’s always “fixing her papers.”  That one friend who doesn’t leave the house very often.  According to various statistical computations, Filipinos who are undocumented in the United States number anywhere between 250,000 and 310,000, representing the largest Asian undocumented population.  Far from being solely a Latino issue, unlawful immigration very much affects Filipinos in a multitude of ways.

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In this episode of This Filipino American Life, we speak to Vanessa Vela-Lovelace, a community leader who spent much of her life as an undocumented immigrant, and Set Ronquillo, an immigrant rights activist who is currently undocumented.  Vanessa and Set have led and continue to lead complicated lives because of their immigration statuses.  Listen as they share their experiences of fear, anger, and hope living in the United States. And like Mateo Liwanag’s character in the NBC show Superstore and Pulitzer-prize winner Jose Antonio Vargas, their stories will shed light on a huge part of our Filipino American community.

Listen through the embedded player below, download directly here, or subscribe to us on iTunes here.

Shorts to Catch

As a former features programmer I always thought the shorts programmers did so much more work. We would screen 250-300 films. Shorts programmers would screen 550-600 films! And then they would create thematic programs based on what they’d seen.

These four short programs run the gamut of 90s nostalgia, highlight the process of memory, use animation to explore imagination, and showcase what sentiments are found in a rebel heart.

Get your tickets today!

 

laapff 2017

Remember you can always purchase a Ticket Package! Festival Ticket 10-Pack ($120 Member/$135 General) Buy 10 tickets at a discounted price! Festival Pass ($300 Member/$330 General) Get priority seating and entry to the majority of Festival events!

Episode 10.5: TV Party

On this mini episode we talk TV! What were your favorite TV shows growing up? As 80s babies we rehash our love of Saturday morning cartoons, Saved By The Bell, and A-Team. Do you remember Ernie Reyes Jr on Sidekicks?

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Or are you a fan of TJ Perkins on WWE?

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What would a Filipino American TV show look like for the TFAL crew? Want to know what the Filipino American version of The Walking Dead would be called? Take a listen to find out!

Let us know what your favorite TV shows are! Or what would your TV pitch be for a Filipino American TV show? Email it to us at thisfilipinoamericanlife@gmail.com.  Or leave us a voice message on the TFAL hotline (805) 394-TFAL and maybe, just maybe, we’ll play it on our next podcast episode!

Listen through the embedded player below, download directly here, or subscribe to us on iTunes here!

 

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT!

laapff 2017

TFAL is now a media sponsor for the Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival! Keep an eye out for our recommendations for LAAPFF films here!

Want to check out the festival yourself and possibly meet the TFAL crew? Get ticket packages for LAAPFF here! LAAPFF Ticket Packages

 

Episode 10: Filipinos in the Nursing Industry

Catherine Ceniza Choy, Empire of Care, 2003, Book Cover

Are you a nurse?  Do you know someone or are you related to someone in the nursing field? (Hahaha…of course you do!).  Ever wonder why there are so many Filipino nurses in the United States?

The statistics are astonishing.  According to Aaron Terrazas and Jeanne Batalova from the Migrant Policy Institute, nearly one of every four employed Filipino-born women in the United States worked as a registered nurse.  Among the 666,000 Filipino-born female workers in the U.S. age 16 and older employed in the civilian labor force in 2008, 22.9% (or 152,000) reported working as registered nurses (Source: MPI).

In our latest episode, TFAL speaks with Catherine Ceniza Choy, the foremost scholar on Filipinos in the nursing industry.  She is a Professor and a former Chair of the Department of Ethnic Studies at UC Berkeley (Go Bears!).  She is also a core faculty member of the Center for Southeast Asia Studies, and an affiliated member of the Center for Race & Gender.  Her research expertise includes Asian American history, Filipino American studies, immigration history, adoption studies and nursing history.

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TFAL got a chance to discuss Ceniza-Choy’s award-winning book Empire of Care: Nursing and Migration in Filipino American History (Duke University Press, 2003), which explored how and why the Philippines became the world’s leading exporter of nurses to the United States.

You can purchase your copy of her excellent book here:  Empire of Care: Nursing and Migration in Filipino American History.  Also, check out her latest book, Global Families: A History of Asian International Adoption in America.

Listen through the embedded player below, download directly here, or subscribe to us on iTunes here.

Are you a nurse and would like to share your experience?  Email it to us at thisfilipinoamericanlife@gmail.com.  Or better yet, leave a voice message on the TFAL hotline (805) 394-TFAL and maybe, just maybe, we’ll play it on our next podcast episode!

Episode 9.5: Hilaw Pa 2.0…or Siri Is Too Serious

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Is there a use for Filipino American holiday?  Is there a way to accommodate bigger and bigger family parties?  Is there a better way to transport stuff to loved ones in the Philippines?  Why, yes, of course!!!

The TFAL crew answers all these questions and more in their second installment of Hilaw Pa where we talk about zany half-baked ideas that Filipinos and Filipino Americans can relate to!  Of course, none of us will ever pursue these projects – that’s for you all to take on!  Our job is just to put it out there in the world.   As green mangoes with bagoong have taught us, raw things are just as good as ripe ones!

Listen through the embedded player below, download directly here, or subscribe to us on iTunes here.

Do you have a half-baked idea you’d like to share with us?  Email it to us at thisfilipinoamericanlife@gmail.com.  Or better yet, leave a voice message on the TFAL hotline (805) 394-TFAL and maybe, just maybe we’ll play it on our next podcast episode!

Episode 9: Love Life of An Asian Guy

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On this episode of This Filipino American Life, the TFAL crew talks about their experiences with blogging. Blogspot, Xanga, Livejournal and countless other internet sites were the home to our early 00s thoughts and terrible spoken word poetry.  In this new era of blogging, Facebook has become the home of writing down these thoughts. One blogger in particular, Ranier Maningding of The Love Life of an Asian Guy, uses his platform that originally was a place to blog about his experience dating as an Asian American to commentary on race, politics, and pop culture. Listen to how he transitioned from dating to his commentary while growing his audience to close to 200,000 folks!

Ranier is also venturing into podcasting! Here is the teaser for “The Love Life of an Asian Guy” podcast.  You can check it out HERE.

Listen through the embedded player below, download directly here, or subscribe to us on iTunes here.

Are you on tumblr or wordpress? What are you writing about? Is Instagram your thing? What are you taking pictures of? Let us know what your experience blogging was like! Tweet at us (@TFALpodcast), comment on Facebook (This Filipino American Life), leave a comment on this post, or leave us a message on our voicemail! 805-394-TFAL. That’s 805-394-8325.

Episode 8.5: Slow Jamz

Play another slow jam, this time make it sweet…a slow jam.

Many Filipino Americans love slow jamz, that sweet, loving, largely African American-composed music that dominated late nights on urban radio stations during the 1980s and 1990s.  They made slow jam mix tapes and gave it to girls, they sang them on karaoke, there were even some who started singing groups. For many of us the ritual of listening to radio and recording songs on a blank cassette tape was a skill we honed with fine precision. The task of finding the sweet spot where you got the song and not the dj talking  or the dj fading into the next song became a muscle memory.

Passing around mixtapes turned into burning CDs and then sending mp3 files to each other. One particular mix that made the rounds was by DJ Opus, a Filipino American DJ from California. The slow jamz came at you fast and furious on this mix. Back in the day, it could be heard at debuts, formals, and lowered cars with crews of Filipino Americans singing along.

There’s even a 90s Slow Jam Bracket, made by a Fil Am dude! All the songs on this bracket would make an excellent mixtape. 1780229_10152224095592125_126281615_o

In this episode, we discuss the impact slow jamz had on us and other Filipino Americans.  From traditional kundiman to “My Way” to Kai to even Manny Pacquiao, Filipinos can’t get enough of that slow, soulful, baby-making music.

Listen through the embedded player below, download directly here, or subscribe to us on iTunes here.

As a bonus, the TFAL crew has put together our own slow jamz playlist.  Enjoy and sing along to these handpicked songs.

What would your #1 slow jam song be on your bracket? What songs would be on your playlist?  Hit us up on Twitter (@TFALpodcast), Facebook (This Filipino American Life), leave a comment on this post, or leave us a message on our new voicemail! Yes voicemail! TFAL has a phone number folks! 805-394-TFAL. That’s 805-394-8325.