Episode 16.5 – TFAL goes to the Bay: Voicemails / Filipino Folklore

Bernardo_Carpio

Once upon a time…we started a podcast. 

Storytelling is one of the most fun ways we communicate in our podcast – sometimes through deep reflection and other times through funny interpretations of our past.  More importantly, it was a way our parents, grandparents, or teachers were able to communicate important lessons and morals to us as we grew up.  It was a way to engage young minds, and perhaps a vehicle for inspiration.

On this mini episode, TFAL Crew is joined by Roger Habon and Rhean Fajardo, members of our TFAL family, as we share fables, stories, and legends that some of us grew up hearing.  We look at Filipino folk tales that our parents and grandparents have passed on to us.  Discover with us the legend of the pineapple, who is afraid of the “white lady” and why you shouldn’t be eating red meat with tea!

Plus, listen to our fans who have left us voicemails asking important questions about Filipino American food and identity.

In honor of Filipino American History Month, we record from Arkipelago Books, a Filipino bookstore in the SoMa Pilipinas district in San Francisco.  They have been a great pillar to the Filipino American community in the Bay and our gracious hosts for this episode.

Whether written or told, share our stories, pass on your own, and discuss. Let’s learn together and not be Juan Tamad about it.

Listen through the embedded player below, download directly here or subscribe to us on iTunes here!

2 thoughts on “Episode 16.5 – TFAL goes to the Bay: Voicemails / Filipino Folklore

  1. I’ve heard the Karabao and Baka legend too! My aunt told me about that. But in the story, she said that when they were in the water, something or someone startled them — maybe it was the owner of the property — and so they had to quickly run out, but accidentally switched their skins. So glad to know someone else heard that story too!

    Like

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