Podcasts

Episode 11.5 – Palo!

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Photo credit: Ted Visaya Design

“You want palo??”

If you grew up in a Filipino household, you probably know what the word palo means.

Palo, a Tagalog word that means spank, which derived from the Spanish word palo or stick (those colonizers yo!), is a form of punishment used to discipline misbehaving children. To a kid, hearing that word from their parents elicited fear because it meant you did something wrong and it also meant punishment was coming.  Palo could have been done with a slipper, a belt, or a hand, to help us respect the rules of the home and understand authority.

On this TFAL episode, join the crew along with our own graphic designer, Vince, as we look back on how we were disciplined as kids.  We also discuss methods some of us would use as we raise or begin to start thinking about raising our own.  Find out who was the good kid and who was the medium good kid, and who got punished for breaking a guitar over someone’s head!

Spanking as a form of punishment can be a very sensitive subject.  But if you have any thoughts on this topic, please email us at thisfilipinoamericanlife@gmail.com, leave a comment, or call our TFAL hotline at (805) 394-TFAL on whether or not you think spanking is an effective form of punishment, or whether you think there are alternative forms of discipline that work.

Listen through the embedded player below, download directly here, or subscribe to us on iTunes here.

Episode 11 – Undocumented Filipinos

As Filipino Americans, we all know or know of someone in our lives who is undocumented.  That one uncle who left his family in the Philippines.  That one auntie who’s always “fixing her papers.”  That one friend who doesn’t leave the house very often.  According to various statistical computations, Filipinos who are undocumented in the United States number anywhere between 250,000 and 310,000, representing the largest Asian undocumented population.  Far from being solely a Latino issue, unlawful immigration very much affects Filipinos in a multitude of ways.

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In this episode of This Filipino American Life, we speak to Vanessa Vela-Lovelace, a community leader who spent much of her life as an undocumented immigrant, and Set Ronquillo, an immigrant rights activist who is currently undocumented.  Vanessa and Set have led and continue to lead complicated lives because of their immigration statuses.  Listen as they share their experiences of fear, anger, and hope living in the United States. And like Mateo Liwanag’s character in the NBC show Superstore and Pulitzer-prize winner Jose Antonio Vargas, their stories will shed light on a huge part of our Filipino American community.

Listen through the embedded player below, download directly here, or subscribe to us on iTunes here.

Episode 10.5 – TV Party

On this mini episode we talk TV! What were your favorite TV shows growing up? As 80s babies we rehash our love of Saturday morning cartoons, Saved By The Bell, and A-Team. Do you remember Ernie Reyes Jr on Sidekicks?

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Or are you a fan of TJ Perkins on WWE?

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What would a Filipino American TV show look like for the TFAL crew? Want to know what the Filipino American version of The Walking Dead would be called? Take a listen to find out!

Let us know what your favorite TV shows are! Or what would your TV pitch be for a Filipino American TV show? Email it to us at thisfilipinoamericanlife@gmail.com.  Or leave us a voice message on the TFAL hotline (805) 394-TFAL and maybe, just maybe, we’ll play it on our next podcast episode!

Listen through the embedded player below, download directly here, or subscribe to us on iTunes here!

 

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT!

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TFAL is now a media sponsor for the Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival! Keep an eye out for our recommendations for LAAPFF films here!

Want to check out the festival yourself and possibly meet the TFAL crew? Get ticket packages for LAAPFF here! LAAPFF Ticket Packages

 

Episode 10 – Filipinos in the Nursing Industry

Are you a nurse?  Do you know someone or are you related to someone in the nursing field? (Hahaha…of course you do!).  Ever wonder why there are so many Filipino nurses in the United States?

The statistics are astonishing.  According to Aaron Terrazas and Jeanne Batalova from the Migrant Policy Institute, nearly one of every four employed Filipino-born women in the United States worked as a registered nurse.  Among the 666,000 Filipino-born female workers in the U.S. age 16 and older employed in the civilian labor force in 2008, 22.9% (or 152,000) reported working as registered nurses (Source: MPI).

In our latest episode, TFAL speaks with Catherine Ceniza Choy, the foremost scholar on Filipinos in the nursing industry.  She is a Professor and a former Chair of the Department of Ethnic Studies at UC Berkeley (Go Bears!).  She is also a core faculty member of the Center for Southeast Asia Studies, and an affiliated member of the Center for Race & Gender.  Her research expertise includes Asian American history, Filipino American studies, immigration history, adoption studies and nursing history.

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TFAL got a chance to discuss Ceniza-Choy’s award-winning book Empire of Care: Nursing and Migration in Filipino American History (Duke University Press, 2003), which explored how and why the Philippines became the world’s leading exporter of nurses to the United States.

You can purchase your copy of her excellent book here:  Empire of Care: Nursing and Migration in Filipino American History.  Also, check out her latest book, Global Families: A History of Asian International Adoption in America.

Listen through the embedded player below, download directly here, or subscribe to us on iTunes here.

Are you a nurse and would like to share your experience?  Email it to us at thisfilipinoamericanlife@gmail.com.  Or better yet, leave a voice message on the TFAL hotline (805) 394-TFAL and maybe, just maybe, we’ll play it on our next podcast episode!

Episode 9.5 – Hilaw Pa 2.0…or Siri Is Too Serious

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Is there a use for Filipino American holiday?  Is there a way to accommodate bigger and bigger family parties?  Is there a better way to transport stuff to loved ones in the Philippines?  Why, yes, of course!!!

The TFAL crew answers all these questions and more in their second installment of Hilaw Pa where we talk about zany half-baked ideas that Filipinos and Filipino Americans can relate to!  Of course, none of us will ever pursue these projects – that’s for you all to take on!  Our job is just to put it out there in the world.   As green mangoes with bagoong have taught us, raw things are just as good as ripe ones!

Listen through the embedded player below, download directly here, or subscribe to us on iTunes here.

Do you have a half-baked idea you’d like to share with us?  Email it to us at thisfilipinoamericanlife@gmail.com.  Or better yet, leave a voice message on the TFAL hotline (805) 394-TFAL and maybe, just maybe we’ll play it on our next podcast episode!

Episode 9 – Love Life of An Asian Guy

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On this episode of This Filipino American Life, the TFAL crew talks about their experiences with blogging. Blogspot, Xanga, Livejournal and countless other internet sites were the home to our early 00s thoughts and terrible spoken word poetry.  In this new era of blogging, Facebook has become the home of writing down these thoughts. One blogger in particular, Ranier Maningding of The Love Life of an Asian Guy, uses his platform that originally was a place to blog about his experience dating as an Asian American to commentary on race, politics, and pop culture. Listen to how he transitioned from dating to his commentary while growing his audience to close to 200,000 folks!

Ranier is also venturing into podcasting! Here is the teaser for “The Love Life of an Asian Guy” podcast.  You can check it out HERE.

Listen through the embedded player below, download directly here, or subscribe to us on iTunes here.

Are you on tumblr or wordpress? What are you writing about? Is Instagram your thing? What are you taking pictures of? Let us know what your experience blogging was like! Tweet at us (@TFALpodcast), comment on Facebook (This Filipino American Life), leave a comment on this post, or leave us a message on our voicemail! 805-394-TFAL. That’s 805-394-8325.

Episode 8.5 – Slow Jamz

Play another slow jam, this time make it sweet…a slow jam.

Many Filipino Americans love slow jamz, that sweet, loving, largely African American-composed music that dominated late nights on urban radio stations during the 1980s and 1990s.  They made slow jam mix tapes and gave it to girls, they sang them on karaoke, there were even some who started singing groups. For many of us the ritual of listening to radio and recording songs on a blank cassette tape was a skill we honed with fine precision. The task of finding the sweet spot where you got the song and not the dj talking  or the dj fading into the next song became a muscle memory.

Passing around mixtapes turned into burning CDs and then sending mp3 files to each other. One particular mix that made the rounds was by DJ Opus, a Filipino American DJ from California. The slow jamz came at you fast and furious on this mix. Back in the day, it could be heard at debuts, formals, and lowered cars with crews of Filipino Americans singing along.

There’s even a 90s Slow Jam Bracket, made by a Fil Am dude! All the songs on this bracket would make an excellent mixtape. 1780229_10152224095592125_126281615_o

In this episode, we discuss the impact slow jamz had on us and other Filipino Americans.  From traditional kundiman to “My Way” to Kai to even Manny Pacquiao, Filipinos can’t get enough of that slow, soulful, baby-making music.

Listen through the embedded player below, download directly here, or subscribe to us on iTunes here.

As a bonus, the TFAL crew has put together our own slow jamz playlist.  Enjoy and sing along to these handpicked songs.

What would your #1 slow jam song be on your bracket? What songs would be on your playlist?  Hit us up on Twitter (@TFALpodcast), Facebook (This Filipino American Life), leave a comment on this post, or leave us a message on our new voicemail! Yes voicemail! TFAL has a phone number folks! 805-394-TFAL. That’s 805-394-8325.

Episode 8 – Did you eat yet?: A Conversation with Filipino Kitchen

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Nakakaon ka na ba?  Kumain na kayo?  Nangan kan?  Did you eat yet?

Ah yes…the question your parents/grandparents/family members ask you as you walk in the door.  Among Filipinos, it’s a more common way to say hello.

Food is perhaps the most innate thing that makes us human.  It keeps us alive.  It comforts us.  It identifies us.  It connects us.  And at times, it can even divide us.  Food is a window to our historical and contemporary lives like no other.

Filipino food is no exception. A large part of the Filipino American experience is the food we cook, serve, and eat.  Filipino food like kinilaw, chicken afritada, and Jollibee’s peach mango pie can tell us about our history – colonial or otherwise.  Our food also conveys the community’s struggles with health, cultural invisibility, and even mainstream desirability.

In this TFAL episode, we talk to Sarahlynn Pablo of Filipino Kitchen, a media based company which aims to support and promote the awareness of Filipino food here in the United States and throughout the diaspora.  We discuss a myriad of food-related topics: which Filipino dishes comfort us, which dishes we learned later in life, how Filipinos connect with their food heritage, what politics arise when advocates try to mainstream Filipino cuisine, and much more.

Although we barely scratch the surface of Filipino food in this episode, we hope you enjoy this scrumptious discussion.  Make sure to eat while listening or plan to eat afterwards because this episode will make you hungry!  Where’s my fork and spoon?  Fuck it…I’ll just use my hands!

Listen through the embedded player below, download directly HERE, or subscribe to us on iTunes here!

Finally, check out our friends’ websites here:

Filipino Kitchen – http://filipino.kitchen/

Sarahlynn Pablo’s WordPress – https://sarahlynnpablo.wordpress.com/

And check out this YouTube web series, Market to Master, to get a glimpse of different kinds of foods from all over the Philippines: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DDisdSjO_Ro

Episode 7.5 – Happy Pilipinx New Year!

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Happy 2017 TFAL pans!

For some of us, 2016 left bad tastes in our collective mouths and 2017 couldn’t come any sooner.  Though the world is a bit more uncertain than ever, we can hope that the new year will bring more good than bad, more prosperity than scarcity, and more laughter than tears.

Along with a new year, comes new resolutions, new beginnings, and at times, new identities.  Among these is a new way of describing ourselves.  The term “Pilipinx” has emerged over the last few years as a new nomenclature for Filipino.  We’re not sure of its exact origins, but can we assume it came from progressive college students.

Recalling the old P/Filipino debates of yesteryear, we discuss “Pilipinx” in this episode – its intention, its promise, and its utility.  And of course, we discuss our unique Filipino American New Year’s traditions.  Start off the new year right and fill your ears with TFAL!

Listen through the embedded player below, download directly here, or subscribe to us on iTunes here!

Bonus Episode – Celebrating Filipino American History Month at FPAC & the LA Greek Theater

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Before we say goodbye to 2016, we’ve got one more episode of TFAL to share with all of you!  This past October the TFAL crew talked to some of the artists that were featured at the 25th Annual Festival of Philippine Arts & Culture (FPAC) and at the Filipino American History Month FAHM Celebration at the LA Greek Theater.  Many thanks to everyone we got to interview who shared their thoughts about FPAC, the FAHM showcase, and about Filipino American History Month overall. And a big shout out to the folks who came up to us and told us they were fans of the show, we were truly honored meet all of you!  Happy New Year, and look forward to even more TFAL in 2017!

Listen through the embedded player below, download directly here, or subscribe to us on iTunes here!

 

 

From FPAC

From FAHM Celebration